I am a young man named Chad and I am eccentric. I have odd taste in music and art but, it fits me! I try to live by my motto "It's only weird if you make it weird!" So you shouldn't be surprised if you find something interesting here. Also don't be afraid to ask me a question!

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Lock, Stock, and History with 419 notes

packconfig:

1916 private soldier, Battle of the Somme
A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 
By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here. 
Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:
Hob nail boots
Puttees (for binding trousers around lower legs)
Socks
Shirt and vest
Gas mask container
Gas mask
Non Commissioned ranks hat
Notebook and service warrant card
Battledress tunic – note stripes on sleeve denote rank
Mess tins
Tin opener and can of food, appears to be tinned stewed apple
Oxo cubes
Bar of chocolate
Bar of soap
Water flask
Belt
Leather belt with leather pouches for kit
Haversack
Longjohn under garments, battledress trousers and braces
Boot polish and two brushes
Blankets
Dog tags – imprinted with name, rank and service number
Trench club – for breaking heavy ground for trenching into and for fighting the enemy at close quarters
Entrenching tool handle; often the handle was customised with lumps of metal and made into a trench club
Leather pouch for entrenching tool
Field dressing
Cigarettes and matches
Mess kit containing knife, fork spoon, shaving brush, soap and brass button polisher (slid underneath battledress button to protect BD from polish)
Polish
Razor
Gun oil
Cloth for pull-through for cleaning barrels internally
Bullet
Ammunition belt, containing clips of bullets
Penknife and pull through cord
Entrenching tool spade; sometimes soldiers sharpened the edges of the spade and used these to fight
Lee Enfield 303 bolt action rifle. It was developed at the beginning of the twentieth century as an attempt to create a standard rifle for both the infantry and soldiers on horseback. As it turned out it was ideally suited to conditions in the trenches – it wasn’t good at firing over long distances, but was really robust and could stand up to the mud. It was still used right up into the 1950s.
Bayonet – to be attached to fore end of rifle
Helmet – with cover
Fob watch, personal effects. Officers tended to have pocket watches more so than infantry soldiers
Coins – possibly local francs or similar, personal effects
Scabbard for bayonet, worn on leather belt around waist over hip
5 round ammunition clips – ready to load magazine of 303 rifle

packconfig:

1916 private soldier, Battle of the Somme

A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 

By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here

Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:

  1. Hob nail boots
  2. Puttees (for binding trousers around lower legs)
  3. Socks
  4. Shirt and vest
  5. Gas mask container
  6. Gas mask
  7. Non Commissioned ranks hat
  8. Notebook and service warrant card
  9. Battledress tunic – note stripes on sleeve denote rank
  10. Mess tins
  11. Tin opener and can of food, appears to be tinned stewed apple
  12. Oxo cubes
  13. Bar of chocolate
  14. Bar of soap
  15. Water flask
  16. Belt
  17. Leather belt with leather pouches for kit
  18. Haversack
  19. Longjohn under garments, battledress trousers and braces
  20. Boot polish and two brushes
  21. Blankets
  22. Dog tags – imprinted with name, rank and service number
  23. Trench club – for breaking heavy ground for trenching into and for fighting the enemy at close quarters
  24. Entrenching tool handle; often the handle was customised with lumps of metal and made into a trench club
  25. Leather pouch for entrenching tool
  26. Field dressing
  27. Cigarettes and matches
  28. Mess kit containing knife, fork spoon, shaving brush, soap and brass button polisher (slid underneath battledress button to protect BD from polish)
  29. Polish
  30. Razor
  31. Gun oil
  32. Cloth for pull-through for cleaning barrels internally
  33. Bullet
  34. Ammunition belt, containing clips of bullets
  35. Penknife and pull through cord
  36. Entrenching tool spade; sometimes soldiers sharpened the edges of the spade and used these to fight
  37. Lee Enfield 303 bolt action rifle. It was developed at the beginning of the twentieth century as an attempt to create a standard rifle for both the infantry and soldiers on horseback. As it turned out it was ideally suited to conditions in the trenches – it wasn’t good at firing over long distances, but was really robust and could stand up to the mud. It was still used right up into the 1950s.
  38. Bayonet – to be attached to fore end of rifle
  39. Helmet – with cover
  40. Fob watch, personal effects. Officers tended to have pocket watches more so than infantry soldiers
  41. Coins – possibly local francs or similar, personal effects
  42. Scabbard for bayonet, worn on leather belt around waist over hip
  43. 5 round ammunition clips – ready to load magazine of 303 rifle

Source: packconfig

30th August 2014

Photo reblogged from DARKMEAT INDUSTRIAL BEAT with 11 notes

odonisorphane:

New Trending GIF from GIPHY!

odonisorphane:

New Trending GIF from GIPHY!

Source: odonisorphane

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Lock, Stock, and History with 1,113 notes

peashooter85:

Scarce Dumontier pinfire revolver dagger, originates from France, mid 19th century.

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from with 439 notes

Source: comunistalibertario

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from with 3,094 notes

Source: hesspartacus

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Pipes, Beards and Guns... Kentucky Bourbon too with 54 notes

twippyfan:

CZ pistols   top .32 acp  bottom .380 acp (short 9mm)

twippyfan:

CZ pistols   top .32 acp  bottom .380 acp (short 9mm)

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from DARKMEAT INDUSTRIAL BEAT with 209 notes

ruiraiox:

Industrial music patron saint Cosey Fanni Tutti.
In 1975, Genesis P-Orridge and Cosey Fanni Tutti consumed blood, semen and piss onstage in the UK. Government officials labeled them “the Wreckers of Civilization.” A female sex worker, Cosey examined “how men and women interact in a sexually charged/volatile manipulated situation” by fearlessly, shockingly putting her body on display. This was the beginning of industrial music, a genre rooted in taboo and transgression.
The tradition continued. In 1985, Coil’s cover of Tainted Love addressed the AIDS crisis at a time when huge stigma still surrounded the discussion. The release of the single constituted the first AIDS benefit in music history.
 In 1988, Skinny Puppy spoke out passionately about animal rights through a series of live shows that involved animal blood and graphic, distressing portrayals of vivisection.
 During the Siege of Sarajevo in 1995, Laibach’s NSK diplomatic passports literally saved lives by enabling people to escape from the war zone at a time when Bosnian passports weren’t considered valid. The giants of industrial used subversive tactics to challenge audiences and create new awareness.
But something happened. Once industrial music had fully transitioned from avant-garde venues into nightclubs, the stench of Axe body spray began to dominate the subculture as a certain douchey, bro-tastic vibe emerged. Where the goth/industrial scene had once existed as a safe haven for artists, weirdos, outcasts, geeks, dreamers and rebels, a disturbing trend of sexism, racism and anti-intellectualism is driving people out.

ruiraiox:

Industrial music patron saint Cosey Fanni Tutti.

In 1975, Genesis P-Orridge and Cosey Fanni Tutti consumed blood, semen and piss onstage in the UK. Government officials labeled them “the Wreckers of Civilization.” A female sex worker, Cosey examined “how men and women interact in a sexually charged/volatile manipulated situation” by fearlessly, shockingly putting her body on display. This was the beginning of industrial music, a genre rooted in taboo and transgression.

The tradition continued. In 1985, Coil’s cover of Tainted Love addressed the AIDS crisis at a time when huge stigma still surrounded the discussion. The release of the single constituted the first AIDS benefit in music history.

 In 1988, Skinny Puppy spoke out passionately about animal rights through a series of live shows that involved animal blood and graphic, distressing portrayals of vivisection.

 During the Siege of Sarajevo in 1995, Laibach’s NSK diplomatic passports literally saved lives by enabling people to escape from the war zone at a time when Bosnian passports weren’t considered valid. The giants of industrial used subversive tactics to challenge audiences and create new awareness.

But something happened. Once industrial music had fully transitioned from avant-garde venues into nightclubs, the stench of Axe body spray began to dominate the subculture as a certain douchey, bro-tastic vibe emerged. Where the goth/industrial scene had once existed as a safe haven for artists, weirdos, outcasts, geeks, dreamers and rebels, a disturbing trend of sexism, racism and anti-intellectualism is driving people out.

Source: ruiraiox

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from DARKMEAT INDUSTRIAL BEAT with 1,041 notes

Source: gh-05-t

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 9,618 notes

beyonseh:

If you’re wondering what “rubber bullets” are and what they look like this is it. This is what Ferguson police are shooting and the peaceful protesters. This is what’s making gaping holes inside of the protesters.

Source: beyonseh

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from ψ (ʘ 益 ʘ) ψ with 291 notes

tenebrum:

Henry Hugh Armstead (British, 1828 - 1905) St Michael and the Serpent or Satan dismayed ,1853.

tenebrum:

Henry Hugh Armstead (British, 1828 - 1905) St Michael and the Serpent or Satan dismayed ,1853.

Source: tenebrum

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Lock, Stock, and History with 1,489 notes

peashooter85:

Rare and unusual 30 shot revolver, most likely of French or Belgian origin, mid to late 19th century.

18th August 2014

Photo reblogged from with 10,252 notes

shit-in-yer-cereal:

despitetheobvious:

I just need this shirt

this shirt is my life

shit-in-yer-cereal:

despitetheobvious:

I just need this shirt

this shirt is my life

Source: phoredheadgingergen

17th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Nec timeo, nec sperno with 1,699 notes

paradisewitch:

Tokyo Gore Police - 2008 - Yoshihiro Nishimura

Source: witchguardian

15th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Nec timeo, nec sperno with 13,954 notes

officeofnerd:

150 year old Victorian prosthetic hand. 

officeofnerd:

150 year old Victorian prosthetic hand. 

Source: officeofnerd

14th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Nec timeo, nec sperno with 25,096 notes

cutiecommando:

This is for those who are curious and you all out in Ferguson. I’m going to be attaching some info graphics (one may seem needless due to circumstances but I’m adding it anyway.) I have some more info I’d like to put into a better to use format ( alot of them are screen grabs and I’d like to put in clearer and slur free language.) If you want me to send anything I got or any info I have ( I’m a Criminal Justice student) don’t hesitate to ask. 

I have seen a few of these but a post with them compiled may help more. I will be editing these as I get it all prepared I’ll use the Ferguson Protest Aid tag for any updates I do. Stay safe everyone.

Source: cutiecommando